Creating Sensorial Experience with Data

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5 Senses

There are five basic human senses: touch, sight, hearing, smell and taste. The sensing organs associated with each sense send information to the brain to help us understand and perceive the world around us. However, there are in fact  other human senses in addition to the basic five that you couldn't live without. These lesser-known senses include spatial awareness and balance. Here's how the human senses work.

VISION

Through your eyes

Humans have five senses: the eyes to see, the tongue to taste, the nose to smell, the ears to hear, and the skin to touch. By far the most important organs of sense are our eyes. We perceive up to 80% of all impressions by means of our sight.

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HEARING

Listening

As one of our most important senses, the ability to hear enables us to connect to the world for many very important, even vital, reasons. Most importantly, hearing connects us to people enabling us to communicate in a way that none of our other senses can achieve.

Smell

Taste

The sense of smell has many functions, including detecting desirable foods, hazards, and pheromones, and plays a role in taste.

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Taste

Taste

The gustatory system or sense of taste is the sensory system that is partially responsible for the perception of taste (flavor).[1] Taste is the perception produced or stimulated when a substance in the mouth reacts chemically with taste receptor cells located on taste buds in the oral cavity, mostly on the tongue.

Touch

The gustatory system or sense of taste is the sensory system that is partially responsible for the perception of taste (flavor).[1] Taste is the perception produced or stimulated when a substance in the mouth reacts chemically with taste receptor cells located on taste buds in the oral cavity, mostly on the tongue.

Image by Elen Yatsenko